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Welcome to the official blog for Villanova's Graduate English Program! Come back often for updates on conference opportunities, guest speakers, student accomplishments, alumni news, and more. Also be sure to check out our Facebook page for more updates.

Sunday, January 7, 2018

Call for Papers: Emerging Voices in Irish Studies Graduate Student Conference, University of Connecticut

The University of Connecticut is hosting a one-day graduate student Irish Studies conference,  "Emerging Voices in Irish Studies," on March 3, 2018.


As always, remember that if you decide to submit proposals to any conferences, be sure to consider applying for funding. See the Graduate Studies Office’s webpage on Conference Travel Funding. And remember that you have to apply for the funding before you attend the conference. (In recent years, the funding has tended to run out early in the spring semester.) If necessary, they might also seek funding through their departments and the Center for Irish Studies.

Wednesday, January 3, 2018

Call for Papers: Rutgers University, Camden

The English Graduate Student Association, is pleased to invite papers from graduate, and
exceptional undergraduate, students within literary studies, literary theory or philosophy, digital
studies, film studies, game studies, creative writing, literacy studies, linguistics, rhetoric/
composition, and childhood studies for our fourth annual conference on April 14, 2018.
Papers and presentations might include (but are not limited to):
• Histories, of any kind
• Identity
• Materialisms
• Digital Content and Spaces
• Exile and Migration
• Colonialism
• Post/Trans Humanism, Animal Studies
• Modernity and Post-Modernity
• Mysticisms, Religion
• Hauntology
• Affect
• Popular Culture
Keynote Speaker: TBD

Submission Deadline: Proposals should be submitted to egsa2018conference@gmail.com by
February 15th, 2018.
Submission Guidelines: Please submit a 350 word abstract proposing a 8-12 page paper.
Abstracts should be added to the email submission as an attachment with no identifying
information present. In the body of the email, please include your name, affiliated institution,
area of study, and contact information.
For questions, email egsa2018conference@gmail.com.

As always, remember that if you decide to submit proposals to any conferences, be sure to consider applying for funding. See the Graduate Studies Office’s webpage on Conference Travel Funding. And remember that you have to apply for the funding before you attend the conference. (In recent years, the funding has tended to run out early in the spring semester.)

Thursday, December 7, 2017

Gender and Women's Studies CFP

Gender and Women's Studies Student Research Conference
CALL FOR PAPERS
The 29th Annual Gender & Women’s Studies Student Research Conference is on Friday, April 6, 2018. It is an exciting opportunity to showcase your work, discuss your interests with students and faculty from Villanova and other area universities, and see the broad range of intellectual disciplines encompassed by Gender and Women’s Studies. Essays and creative work must engage gender, sexuality, or feminist theories. All papers must have been written during Spring or Fall 2017 or written specifically for the conference.

Paper Eligibility and Submission Guidelines:

Submission Deadline: Friday, February 16, 2018
Conference presented by Villanova's Gender & Women's Studies Program and The Greater Philadelphia Women's Studies Consortium. 

Questions? Email gws@villanova.edu

Wednesday, December 6, 2017

Call for Papers- St. John's University

The Department of English at St. John's University invites papers that think about narrative across literary and writing studies.

The Department of English at St. John's University invites papers that think about narrative
across literary and writing studies. Our topic for this year's graduate conference, "Telling Stories: Rethinking Narrative in Literary and Writing Studies," asks us to consider what is entailed in generating narrative(s). We seek work that explores the cultural place of stories and their various modes of telling-through drama, poetry, prose forms, performance, digital media, translation--as well as the role of narrative in pedagogy and writing studies, in any historical, national, or diasporic tradition. Conceiving of "telling stories" broadly, we welcome work that critically
engages or reconceptualizes storytelling, including analyses of individual, collective, or representative texts or performances; considerations of the making or origins of narrative; and theoretical and pedagogical approaches to the telling or composition of stories.

Does storytelling constitute culture, or rupture it? Does it traverse cultural boundaries or reinforce them, assemble communities or alienate its tellers? How does one invent narrative voice creatively, or develop a plot through literacy or writing pedagogies? What is the role of race, sex, gender, class, or ability in the production of narrative, and do these identity categories become experimental in the writing, telling, or performing of stories? Are stories always told by human subjects? What is the status of omniscience-does it reinforce or subvert ideology? How does poetic, dramatic, or embodied voice deploy narrative?

These examples reflect only some of the possible approaches to storytelling we envision. We hope to generate a common conversation across the wide spectrum of our discipline, from writing studies to literary studies, pedagogy to performance. Papers on all genres, periods, and methodologies are welcome, including creative work. Panels will reflect convergences among submitted work and will facilitate exchange, we hope, across periods, methodologies, and subfields.

Submit 300-word abstracts for 15-minute papers to the conference committee at sjugradconference@gmail.com by February 1, 2018. Please remember to include your contact information and affiliation with your titled submission.

Thursday, November 30, 2017

Call for Papers: New Biopolitics: An Interdisciplinary Graduate Student Conference

New Biopolitics: An Interdisciplinary Graduate Student Conference
Georgetown University, Washington, D.C.
Saturday, February 24, 2018
Keynote Speaker: Kyla Wazana Tompkins, Pomona College

Conference Information, from Georgetown:

Michel Foucault defines biopolitics as “this very specific, albeit very complex, power that has
the population as its target, political economy as its major form of knowledge and apparatuses of
security [or dispositifs] as its essential technical instrument.” Timothy Campbell and Adam Sitze,
in turn, describe the “biopolitical turn” as “a proliferation of studies, claiming Foucault as an
inspiration, on the relations between ‘life’ and ‘politics.’”

As scholars have further engaged with and complicated the concept of biopolitics, new trends
have emerged from its lineage – from necropolitics to the global proliferations of surveillance to
biomanufacturing.

To revisit and expand conceptions of biopolitics, the English Graduate Student Association at
Georgetown University seeks proposals from various disciplines and theoretical approaches,
with an emphasis on how the humanities and social sciences have approached this field. Some
possible lines of inquiry include: How have body modifications like reading glasses and walking
canes or scarification and subdermal implants redefined feeling and experience? With Europe's
recent court cases on the "right to be forgotten" in mind, how does the inability to have our
presence die on the Internet extend our boundaries of life? In what ways has literature or film
redefined conception and birth with our society's focus on reproductive rights? Refuting
traditional notions of the human-animal binary, how has technology reified and/or complicated
our distinctions between the human and the other?

While certainly not comprehensive, papers addressing any of the following are welcome:

• The ontological turn
• Affect studies
• Ecological approaches/ the Anthropocene
• Law and literature
• Materialisms
• Temporality
• Digital humanities
• Boundaries of the human
• Pop culture
• Biotechnology
• Cyborg studies

Please submit your 300-word abstracts to newbiopolitics@gmail.com by December 15th, 2017,
Submissions should include your proposed paper title as well as a short bio (100 words), giving
your name, institutional affiliation, and department.

As always, remember that if you decide to submit proposals to any conferences, be sure to consider applying for funding. See the Graduate Studies Office’s webpage on Conference Travel Funding. And remember that you have to apply for the funding before you attend the conference. (In recent years, the funding has tended to run out early in the spring semester.)

Call for Papers: "In the Name of Conscience": An Emerging Scholars Conference on Genocide, Mass Atrocity, and Human Rights

The society of students in the Master of Arts in Holocaust and Genocide Studies (MAHG) Program at Stockton University would like to invite graduate students in English at Villanova University to submit presentation proposals for an emerging scholars conference we are organizing for Tuesday, March 27, 2018.

"In the Name of Conscience": An Emerging Scholars Conference on Genocide, Mass Atrocity, and Human Rights aims to provide students enrolled in a Master’s level program or students enrolled in the first years of a doctoral degree program the opportunity to present their research interests in a formal conference setting. Participants may submit proposals for papers or for general presentations. All accepted paper proposals will be chosen for presentations during the conference.

The theme of this year’s conference is “The Global Impact of Genocide.” Preferably, proposal topics should be related to the overall theme, but applicants should feel comfortable submitting proposals related to the general subjects of genocide, mass atrocity, or human rights. The theme of each panel session will be determined based on the proposals that are selected for presentation. Faculty members of the Holocaust and Genocide Studies Program at Stockton University will moderate each panel session.

The conference will take place on Tuesday, March 27, 2018 at Stockton University, 101 Vera King Farris Drive, Galloway, NJ 08205. Dr. Alexander Alvarez, Ida E. King Distinguished Visiting Professor in Holocaust Studies at Stockton University & Professor of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Northern Arizona University, will give the keynote address.

If your are interested in participating, please send an abstract with title (1 page max) and short biography (1 page max) to Sarah Albertson (Sarah.Albertson@stockton.edu) by February 16, 2018 with the subject line: Proposal for “In the Name of Conscience.” In the body of the email, include your name, graduate program or major, university, and email address. Panel proposals will also be considered.

Visit this document for additional program info!

As always, remember that if you decide to submit proposals to any conferences, be sure to consider applying for funding. See the Graduate Studies Office’s webpage on Conference Travel Funding. And remember that you have to apply for the funding before you attend the conference. (In recent years, the funding has tended to run out early in the spring semester.)

Wednesday, November 8, 2017

Call for Papers: "Formations," UMD English Graduate Conference

Formations: Intersections of Form Across the Literary, Social, and Political
11th Annual Graduate English Organization Conference
Department of English, University of Maryland, College Park,
March 10, 2018
“Forms... mean all shapes and configurations, all ordering principles, all patterns of repetition and difference,” writes Caroline Levine in Forms: Whole, Rhythm, Hierarchy, Network (Princeton University Press, 2015). Forms, understood broadly, are at work both within and beyond the realm of aesthetics; they configure and shape politics, culture, and social interactions; they include hierarchies, patterns, dichotomies, containers, and webs. How, then, do the plurality of forms at work in any given context interact, overlap, and influence each other?

We envision “Formations” as an exploration of the myriad and overlapping forms that govern experience and interpretation​, as well as an inquiry into the action of forming. It is action, after all, that BeyoncĂ© implies with her rallying call, “now let’s get in formation,” at the conclusion of Lemonade. There, we are confronted with a collision of the aesthetic, the political, and the social. How do aesthetic formations subvert, reinforce, echo, and fight against social or political formations? By examining actions of forming, re-forming, and deforming, “Formations” attends to the practices of inclusion and exclusion through which forms are marked and maintained.

In addition to critical presentations, we welcome collaborative projects and creative work in fiction, poetry, drama, dance, arts, and film. Topics of potential essays can include, but are not limited to:
  • How sociopolitical constructions of race, gender, sexuality, and class interact with each other and with aesthetic form
  • How political, social, and literary forms enter and shape one another
  • Material forms and perception of them
  • How entrenched forms exclude and create Others, particularly in relation to questions of (dis)ability, privilege, and morality
  • The persistence, subversion, or reinvention of form in popular culture, protest, social media, and other contexts both literary and beyond
  • Technology’s impact on how we perceive and apply aesthetic forms, patterns, and hierarchies
  • Forming academic writing, language(s), and classrooms
  • Temporal and geographical divisions between areas of literary study
  • Points of (dis)connection between creative and critical work
  • Form in the materiality of texts and their production
  • Historical or geopolitical formations of nations, regions, and communities
  • The ways that forms travel across different media, including visual art, sound, film, etc.
  • The development and application of linguistic and rhetorical forms
  • The body and its representation
  • Institutional organization and the formation of academic disciplines
Please submit proposals for fifteen-minute presentations. Panel submissions (three presentations per panel) are highly encouraged, as are other collaborative projects. Proposals for papers or panels should be 300-word abstracts. Proposals for creative work should be a short sample from an original composition or a description of the intended work. Please include your full name and email address.

Abstracts are due January 5 and should be e-mailed to conference.geo@gmail.com.

As always, remember that if you decide to submit proposals to any conferences, be sure to consider applying for funding. See the Graduate Studies Office’s webpage on Conference Travel Funding. And remember that you have to apply for the funding before you attend the conference. (In recent years, the funding has tended to run out early in the spring semester.)